Preparing the Emergency Backpack in Case of the Zombie Apocalypse, or Other Disasters

I read a lot of Sci-Fi, alternate universe, end of world Apocalypse type of books.  Many of these found in the young adult or juvenile section of the library.  I tell myself it is important to read what my kids are reading, to have subjects of overlap, but I actually enjoy most of what I read.

Living in Earthquake country, we are regularly reminded to “Get Ready Marin” and to be prepared for “The Big One.”  This warning, along with my discussions with my sons about the end of the world, has prompted me to keep an Emergency Backpack in the car.  The idea is that should a disaster happen and I am not at home, I need supplies to get home.  I’m assuming the worst, roads are closed, chaos abounds, I have my little one with me and I need two days of supplies.

My friend Sharon and I, discussing the End of the World while making snacks for the kids, were planning on selling these custom Emergency Bags. We compiled a list of items that it should contain.  There are the basics: food, water, shelter.  I always have snacks (fruit and granola bars) in the car (many of these items are transferable from the diaper bag).  With the plethora of drink holders in the car, I usually also have several water bottles in the car, but to beef up the backpack, I bought an aqua straw Emergency Water Filter that purifies any water I find, should the situation turn dire.  For shelter, I threw in a couple of Emergency blankets.

Broken glass seems to be another possible concern, therefore I have a pair of gloves and closed toe shoes for each of us.  I don’t want to be caught on a day where I’m only wearing flip flops or heels.  Luckily, or not, my sons usually leave a pair of shoes in the car, so having that extra pair is already there.

To guard against the elements, I have a sunhat, knit hat, buff, and a rain poncho.  Again, these items are good to have at the ready anyway.  Living where I do, temperatures can be 50 degrees different within a ten mile radius.

Then I looked at the kits:  First Aid, Toiletry, Sewing.  There is some overlap here, but I liked to keep them all separated for easy access.  The First Aid kit, has the basics; bandages, ointment, Advil, necessary medicines, alcohol swabs.  I added a McNett Tactical Gruntline Elastic Cord and Clothesline, a multi-functional rubber cord.  This doubles as a sling, tourniquet and laundry line.  The Toiletry kit has soap, toothpaste, toothbrush, tweezers, sunscreen, lotion, nail clippers, etc.  And I threw in a Sewing kit with extra safety pins, a straight edge razor, thick needles and thread and patches.  I don’t want a torn strap to keep me from transporting my gear.

Additional emergency gear:  flashlights, batteries, radio, lighter, sunglasses, sharpie, plastic ziplock bags and duct tape.  I also added a fun fishing Survival Grenade  that included cord, carabiner, fishing lines and hooks.  We live near the water, who knows how long I could be on the road, living off the land.

Now my sci-fi knowledge comes in.  I have this backpack, full of great supplies.  How can I make sure no one takes it from me?  I talked to Max, my fellow reader.  “Max, should the apocalypse hit, what do I need?”  “A weapon.” He answered.  “But what weapon can I use?  What will give me a head start, because a knife will do no good if the person is bigger and stronger, and I am not keeping a gun in the car?”

I came up with two options, a taser Mini Stun Gun and bear spray Pepper Spray.  Both items went into the pack.  Now I felt ready.  If the big one hits, I can make it home, or at least I’ve done what I can to get there.